Bryant & Stratton College Offers Help To Displaced Workers

June 11, 2009

With the help of U.S. federal funding, local displaced workers seeking job changes are now turning to Bryant & Stratton College for a financially viable and promising second career. U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan recently announced a $7 million grant to establish college programs that prepare displaced workers for a career change. The federal grant provides institutional support to colleges like Bryant & Stratton College, which has gone a step further in offering its own Retraining Opportunity Grant, providing up to $3,000 directly to full-time students.

 

“The federal grant will certainly help build educational programs for these displaced workers. And now, with our Retraining Opportunity Grant, students will receive direct financial assistance because we incorporate the grant into the student’s financial aid package,” explained Pete Pavone, market and campus director of Bryant & Stratton College.

 

“Today, more than ever, the pathway to opportunity absolutely requires a good education. We also believe very strongly that your path to a great future should not be obstructed by the cost of getting that education,” said Pavone. “We understand what people are going through and we want to help anyone in the Milwaukee area who is unemployed and worried about their future.”

 

On May 15, 2009, Glendale Mayor Jerome Tepper and Bayshore Town Center General Manager Chris Jaeger officially welcomed Bryant & Stratton College’s new campus to the north shore in a lease signing ceremony. As the first and only education component, Bryant & Stratton College’s third campus in the metro-Milwaukee area will occupy more than 37,000 square feet of office space at Bayshore Town Center, making it the second largest office tenant.

 

Currently, Bryant & Stratton College’s 15 campuses are now offering a total of $500,000 in institutional grants to help people train for new careers.

 

Pavone was recently asked if a college degree can really be an effective defense against unemployment. He replied, “Definitely. But don’t take my word for it. According to statistics compiled by the U.S. Department of Labor, the unemployment rate goes down dramatically with the level of education you receive. Plus, once someone earns his or her degree at Bryant & Stratton College, they receive career placement assistance. In fact, we have a college-wide career placement rate of 92%, which means a great chance of finding a job after graduation – even in today’s job market.”

 

Bryant & Stratton College offers degree programs in such high demand fields as health care, criminal justice, business and more. Many of these programs can be completed in as few as 16 months. Plus, all were developed based on input from employers throughout Milwaukee, so students are sure to learn the skills that employees are expected to have.

 

“The people of Milwaukee are our friends and neighbors. And as far as we’re concerned, when a friend or neighbor needs your help, you help them,” Pavone remarked.

 

Bryant & Stratton College is a career college delivering outcome based education and training through a flexible, contemporary curriculum in a personalized environment. With campuses across four states, including an Online Education Division and Professional Skills Center, Bryant & Stratton College offers lifelong learning options through Associate, Bachelor and continuing education programs.

 

For more information, stop by either of their campuses: Downtown on West Wisconsin Avenue, or in Wauwatosa on West Potter Drive. Interested students can also call 276.5200, or visit www.bryantstratton.edu.

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